Lower Division Core Business Courses
All Business Majors must complete these courses to enroll in specific Business courses

Acct 1- See below
Bus 1. General Business

Simulates setting up a small business to explore the many facets of an enterprise (marketing, accounting, finance, management, information systems, etc.). Through self-assessment and readings, directs students toward career paths that best reflect their personal aptitudes and interests

Bus 2. Business Law
In order to survive, business must meet the legal and ethical standards imposed by a changing society. Business enterprise is not an island and business decision-making must be undertaken in light of current legal and ethical demands. Such demands may take the form of globalization of the business enterprise, reactions to hostile takeovers, concerns with market concentration and efficiency, changes in legal philosophy and corporate ethics, and developments in international law and administrative regulation. By examining the philosophical, legal, social, historical, and political/economic regulatory environments, this course places business decision making in the legal and ethical perspective so critical in today’s markets

Econ 1. Macro Economics


he economic way of thinking and the functioning of a market economy. The behavior of consumers and firms, markets for goods and inputs, and principles of international exchange. Applications and policy issues in economics.

Econ 2. Micro Economics

Introduction to the study of the economic system. Course will introduce the standard economic models used to examine how individuals and firms make decisions in perfectly competitive markets.

Math 5. Finite Math

Systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, set theory and probability theory, applications to business and to social sciences.


Accounting Courses

Competition in the business world is fast paced, but the skills obtained through accounting courses will provide tomorrow's workers with the ability to succeed in a variety of settings.

Whether you are developing a small business (entrepreneurship) or work in the corporate world, whether the person desires to work as a paraprofessional or transfer to a four-year college/university, or whether the goal is to work in any area of business, accounting, finance, income taxes, or information systems, an accounting course is the beginning!

CU offers a number of accounting courses to help you reach your professional/personal goals.

This is an customizable list of Accounting courses. Users can add courses or modify the course descriptions.

Accounting
ACCT 1 – 3 Credits
Practical Accounting/Bookkeeping
Provides an overview of basic accounting principles, including skills needed for setup and maintenance of a sole proprietorship; suggested for students not majoring in Accounting or Business Administration to gain thorough understanding of financial records. 3 Units.

ACCT 2– 3 Credits
Principles of Accounting I
Provides in-depth study of the accounting cycle for sole proprietorships, including record-keeping, preparation of financial statements, and the theory of accounts; uses computer technology and problem-solving techniques to supplement classroom work. 3 Units.

ACCT 3 – 3 Credits
Principles of Accounting II
Defines accounting practices for partnerships and corporations through the use of specific accounting problems; explains current accounting systems procedures and the preparation of financial statements, as well as managerial and cost accounting methods. 3 Units.

ACCT 4– 3 Credits
Intermediate Accounting II
Continues the study of financial accounting standards; emphasizes accounting for inventories, securities, stockholders' equity, long-term liabilities, earnings per share, accounting changes, error analysis, and cash flow. 3 Units.

ACCT 5– 3 Credits
Principles of Auditing I
Details the fundamental principles of auditing, to include the study and review of internal accounting controls, auditing standards, professional ethics, and reporting standards; explores data processing and statistical applications of auditing. 3 Units.

ACCT 6 – 3 Credits
Cost Accounting
Describes the nature and purpose of cost accounting in relation to industrial situations; highlights common practices of job order cost accounting, processes, standard and direct costing, preparation of cost statements, analysis of cost information, and project planning and control. 3 Units.
ACCT 7 – 3 Credits
Advanced Accounting I
Studies the application of accounting and business problems; explains financial statement presentation, business combinations and consolidated financial statements, and foreign operations. 3 Units.
ACCT 8 – 3 Credits
Advanced Accounting II
Focuses on the application of accounting and business problems; presents real-life situations involving partnership accounting, government accounting, not-for-profit accounting and segment and interim reporting. 3 Units.

ACCT 9 – 3 Credits
Tax Accounting I
Presents thorough analysis of federal, state, and local taxation related to individuals; provides federal experience in the use of federal and state forms. 3 Units.
ACCT 10– 3 Credits
Tax Accounting II
Examines federal income tax laws and how they are applied to partnerships, corporations, and estates and trusts; demonstrates the actual preparation of federal and state tax returns. 3 Units.

ACCT 11 – 3 Credits
Tax Preparation
Focuses on the problem-solving approach to income tax preparation; highlights the short form 1040-A, regular 1040, and supporting schedules of investment income, itemized deductions, business income including self-employment tax, gains and losses on the sale of investment and business assets, and unusual tax computations. 3 Units.

Business Management Courses


Lower Division Core Business Courses
All Business Majors must complete these courses to enroll in specific Business courses

Acct 1- See course description above
Bus 1. General Business

Simulates setting up a small business to explore the many facets of an enterprise (marketing, accounting, finance, management, information systems, etc.). Through self-assessment and readings, directs students toward career paths that best reflect their personal aptitudes and interests

Bus 2. Business Law
In order to survive, business must meet the legal and ethical standards imposed by a changing society. Business enterprise is not an island and business decision-making must be undertaken in light of current legal and ethical demands. Such demands may take the form of globalization of the business enterprise, reactions to hostile takeovers, concerns with market concentration and efficiency, changes in legal philosophy and corporate ethics, and developments in international law and administrative regulation. By examining the philosophical, legal, social, historical, and political/economic regulatory environments, this course places business decision making in the legal and ethical perspective so critical in today’s markets

Econ 1. Macro Economics
An overview of the modern market economy as a system for dealing with the problem of scarcity. The analysis of relationships among such variables as national income, employment, inflation and the quantity of money. The roles of government expenditure, taxation and monetary policy; international finance; economic development.

Econ 2. Micro Economics
Introduction to the study of the economic system. Course will introduce the standard economic models used to examine how individuals and firms make decisions in perfectly competitive markets.

Math 5. Finite Math
Systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, set theory and probability theory, applications to business and to social sciences.



6. Business Ethics
A normative inquiry into the ethical issues that arise in business and how they should be managed. Attention is given to current moral issues in business, to ethical theories and their implications for these issues, and to the managerial implications. Topics may include truth in advertising, corporate social responsibility, affirmative action, government regulation of business, quality of work life, environmental and resource issues, and ethical codes of conduct. (4 units)


80. Global and Cultural Environment of Business

An examination of the basic conceptual vocabulary and theories regarding the economic, political, and social influences on international business today. Topics may include international trade, financial systems, political institutions, cultural factors, corporate structure, and market entry. Students who take this class may not receive credit for MGMT 80L taken in the SCU London Program, or any equivalent course taken in a study abroad program. Students who take this class may not receive credit for MGMT 80L taken in the SCU London Program, or any equivalent course taken in a study abroad program. Prerequisites: BUSN 70 or BUSN 170 and ECON 3. (4 units)

UPPER-DIVISION COURSES


160. Organization and Management

Introduction to organization theory and practice with an emphasis on organizational behavior, inclusive of the contexts of the individual, the group, and the organization as a whole.

160S. Organization and Management

Introduction to organization theory and practice with an emphasis on organizational behavior, inclusive of the contexts of the individual, the group, and the organization as a whole

161. Management in Organizations

Introduction to management theory and practice including a historical perspective, and the roles and functions of management, as influenced by a sense of ethics and social responsibility in a global environment.

162. Strategic Analysis – The Business Capstone

Focuses on the processes by which managers position their businesses or assets to maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty, rapid change, and competition. Covers various frameworks for analyzing an industry’s structure and a firm’s competitive position and for developing a coherent, viable, and defensible firm strategy. Requires students to integrate and extend the knowledge and skills that they have developed throughout their coursework (i.e., marketing, finance, economics, organizational behavior, ethics, information systems, statistical analysis, operations management, accounting, etc.) into a “total” business perspective.


163. Organizational Theory and Design

Theory and practice of organizational design. Issues include departmentalization and coordination; the effect of context and technology on structure; and organizational growth, change, and decline.

164. Entrepreneurship Management for Technology Ventures

This course is a systematic and practical study of new venture management using case analysis as the primary vehicle of learning and discussion. We will focus on entrepreneurial rather than lifestyle and salary-substitute firms. Entrepreneurial firms are those that bring new products and services to market by creating and seizing opportunities regardless of the resources they currently control. In financial terms, these firms are developed to create wealth and prosperity for all stakeholders.

166. Human Resource Management

Comprehensive review of the role and functions of human resource management departments in business organizations, with particular emphasis on selection and placement, training and development, and compensation systems.

167. Industrial Relations

Examination of union-management relations. Why do employees join unions? How are organizing campaigns and elections won? What are typical negotiating behaviors and strategies? Lecture/discussion, case analyses, negotiation and arbitration simulations, guest speakers.

168. Managing for Sustainability

This course examines the core values, principals, opportunities and challenges for sustainable business management. It includes an analysis of the relationship between business and the natural environment, and economic and social systems, and communities. The course uses environmental ethics to examine climate change, energy, land use, food, health, the value chain, and new approaches to manufacturing and services, using local and global examples.

169. Business and Public Policy

The impact of public policy on business and how businesses adapt to and influence public policies. Includes ideology, corporate social responsibility, government regulations, and business political activity.

170. International Management

The international framework for trade and international investment, a critical discussion of the idea of globalization, the design and staffing of multinational organizational structures and multinational strategies. Prerequisite: MGMT 80. (MGMT 160 or 160S recommended.) (5 units)

174. Social Psychology of Leadership

A conceptual framework for understanding leadership and opportunities for developing leadership skills. This interactive course requires personal reflection into leadership experiences and fieldwork with executives. Note: This course is required for those completing the Leadership Studies Certificate Program.

175. Managing Family Businesses

Issues include managerial and ownership succession, conflicts between family and nonfamily members, and conflicts between family and business cultures. Students will apply organizational behavior concepts to family business issues and develop a useful framework for analyzing and anticipating those issues. Class design incorporates cases, videos, and guest speakers.

177. Managing with the Internet

A modern look at management within small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Weekly topic presentations of management behaviors are followed by team creation of supporting tool/process requirements (covering underlying science, technical, and social issues), mock-up creation using Internet sites (such as Monster.com), presentation of mock-ups, and final assessment vis a vis the stated requirements. Laptop required in class.

179. Project Management

Students will learn how to plan and manage a project. Covers methods for creating a work breakdown structure and project schedule; estimating a project’s budget; and managing a project’s quality, schedule, and financial targets. Course activities include a simulation and team project for applying the methods learned.

197. Special Topics in Management

Offered occasionally to introduce new topics not covered by existing electives. Topics generally reflect the research interests of the faculty teaching the course.

198. Internship/Practicum

Opportunity for selected upper-division students to work in local organizations.

199. Directed Reading/ Directed Research

Independent projects undertaken by upper-division students with a faculty sponsor. Prerequisites: MGMT 160 or 160S, and written proposal must be approved by instructor and chair one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)